Travel insurance companies introduce cover for airspace closure

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It's fair to say that British tourists relying upon taking a flight as part of their trip haven't enjoyed the best of years in 2010. Security scares have wreaked havoc in airports across the UK, whilst the recent winter snap ensured that those well-organised enough to have booked much-needed escapes to the continent for a spell of winter sun were left stranded for hours, and even days in some cases, as snow and ice left planes grounded. Bear in mind that we haven't even mentioned the volcanic ash cloud that brought travel chaos to tourists across the globe earlier this year and you can see why we Brits may be thinking twice about booking our next flight abroad.

However, whilst the weather will always interfere with our plans, and security threats are unfortunately a fact of modern life, two travel insurance companies have taken a brave step towards combating, at least partially, the potentially devastating financial effects of scenarios such as the ash cloud.

HSBC and First Direct have decided to make airspace closure cover a standard feature applicable to each of their travel insurance policies. All policies offered by these companies will now allow tourists to make a claim if they're forced to cancel their trip or are unlucky enough to become stranded abroad as a result of the closure of either airspace, an airport, or a port.

With other extraordinary scenarios also taken into account by the two companies, with terrorism and natural disasters covered in some cases, it seems clear that HSBC and First Direct are setting a standard by which the rest of the travel insurance industry will be judged in years to come.


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