Are you covered if you were drunk on holiday?

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If you’re lounging by the pool, soaking up the rays and sipping a few cold beers throughout the day, then come the evening you might not even realise how much the beer has gone to your head and if you stumble over your feet and break a bone or two, are you right to assume you’ll be covered by your travel insurance?

The consumer website for the travel industry, EssentialTravel.co.uk, have compiled some research from various travel insurance companies and have come up with some pretty scary results, especially for those of you who like a few drinks when abroad. It shows that 7 out of 10 people didn’t know that the amount of alcohol that they’ve imbibed meant they wouldn’t be covered for injuries when on holiday. 8 out of 10 of the same people then admitted to drinking too much when away.

Of course all individual insurance packages are different, but you’re very unlikely ever to find one that doesn’t sting you if a claim is made as a result of being under the influence of alcohol. The most common claim is for the loss, damage or theft of personal items and many people might not realise that excessive alcohol can void such a claim.

Also, 28% of people on holiday suffer a personal injury due to a physical activity (skiing being the biggest one) or risky mode of transport (such as riding a moped), and again this might preclude you receiving any medical treatment if you’re drunk.

It could cost you up to £1000 a day for hospital treatment abroad if you’re not insured. There is a case-by-case review for each claimant, but if there’s too much alcohol in your blood when you are admitted to hospital then it might mean your insurance is invalidated.


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